Sober Living Room for Rent

Drug addicts and alcoholics require a high level of support when they are attempting to get clean and sober. At home, they may feel stressed out, not getting the support they need from family members. Friends who are still using or drinking might influence them to go back out and drink or get high again.

A sober living house gives addicts and alcoholics the support they need to achieve and maintain recovery from substance abuse. Most cities have a number of homes to choose from, and high-quality houses like Real Deal Recovery, located in Dallas, provide a safe and secure environment, helping residents get and stay sober every day.

 

How Does Sober Living Work?

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Sober living homes offer a compromise between the high structure and accountability found in a residential treatment program and the freedom and total lack of structure and accountability in an independent living situation.

Residents might live in single rooms or have a roommate, allowed to go out during the day and returning to the house each night by curfew. Residents are typically required to find work, attend school, or be involved in an outpatient treatment program while in sober living. A manager who lives with the residents keeps track of them and holds them accountable, making sure they follow the rules and performing drug tests to ensure they are staying sober.

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Sober living homes like Real Deal Recovery are also able to offer a wide range of services to their residents not normally found in other homes. Residents receive one-on-one counseling from a recovery coach, must attend work or school and a set number of meetings each week, get to live in a luxurious setting, have a fully-stocked kitchen with food provided by the house, have televisions with cable in each room and Wi-Fi, have a recreation room with a pool table and TV for watching movies, and attend in-house support groups. Additionally, the strong sense of community allows residents to learn to stay sober and enjoy life again together.

Sober living homes do not typically have their residents sign a lease. Instead, residents pay rent month-to-month. This makes things easier on both the resident and the management of the home. Residents are able to move out when they feel they are ready for independent living, often after six months or a year. The house is also able to ask residents who relapse or do not follow the rules to leave, making sure the environment is safe and supportive for the other residents.

 

Is Sober Living Right for Me?

Going to a sober living home may seem like a tall order. Addicts or alcoholics will often come up with a number of reasons why it isn’t a good idea. They might object to the cost, feel that they are able to get sober on their own, feel like it will force them to do things they don’t want to do like go to meetings, feel it will expose them to people they don’t want to be around, or come up with any number of other reasons why they just can’t go to sober living.

But the truth is, these reasons are just excuses. Addicts and alcoholics in early sobriety, whether they are leaving treatment or getting sober on their own, are at an extremely high risk for relapse. Staying in sober living until they are comfortable and stable in recovery is the best way to mitigate this risk.

Since sober living homes are available in a wide price range, cost is not usually an issue. Many homes cost the same or even less than rent for an apartment. Research shows that being part of a recovery community is essential to sobriety. Living together with other addicts and alcoholics greatly increases the chances of staying sober.

Sober living very well might force the addict or alcoholic to do something they don’t want to—and this isn’t a bad thing. Most people don’t like the idea of having to get up in the morning and go to work, having a curfew, and having to attend meetings. But structure and discipline are key parts of the recovery process.

Finally, the community that forms in sober living homes is invaluable. Residents often find themselves forming friendships that last for life. If you ask any of the residents in a home like Real Deal Recovery, they will tell you how important their fellow residents are to them.

 

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